Tag: medical school

Appeal to Teens and Parents to Get Vaccinated

Advertisements

Unity Consortium is thrilled to welcome newest member, Ethan Lindenberger, a 19-year oldAmerican activist known for his opposition to vaccine misinformation efforts. Ethan will be featured in a number of resources as part of Unity’s Voice of AYA (Adolescents and Young Adults) campaign.

Ethan grew up being told that vaccines cause autism, brain damage, and do not benefit the health and safety of society despite the fact such opinions have been debunked numerous times by the scientific community. Through his own research, and relying on scientific evidence, he learned that vaccinations are proven to be a medical miracle, stopping the spread of numerous diseases and therefore saving countless lives. Ethan was dismayed that stories often spread through social media based on skepticism and falsities and were putting lives at danger.

“We all need to follow the CDC’s recommendations and be protected from all vaccine-preventable diseases,” noted Lindenberger.  “I felt a connection with Unity and jumped at the opportunity to become a member because they understand the value of teen and young adult involvement and our ability to be proactive and make the best decisions for ourselves based on decades of research.”

Advertisements

The goal of the campaign is to encourage young adults and teens to get up-to-date with recommended vaccinations and to teach them how to spot vaccine-related misinformation on the internet.  With new outbreaks in diseases, such as the measles epidemics that have hit multiple states in the US, it’s important to spread the word about the importance of vaccinations.  A Unity survey conducted by Harris poll found that 4 in 10 parents and nearly 6 in 10 teens believe teens should only see a doctor for an illness, which likely reduces opportunities for physicians to discuss preventive health measures, such as vaccination. Similarly, the survey showed that 1 in 4 parents and teens believe that vaccines are for babies and not as important for teens.

Unity’s programs focus on educating teens, young adults and parents with evidence based vaccine information. It is done in a way that is grounded in science and with respect to his generation so that teens and young adults feel empowered to make decisions for themselves.

Outcome Health, a technology company providing health education at the moment of care, partnered with Unity to produce video spots featuring Ethan.  Dr. Laura Offutt a physician and teen health advocate is also featured in the spots as an expert source. Since 2018, Outcome Health has delivered Unity’s vaccination and preventative healthcare messages across its nationwide point-of-care platform; this is the first time the organizations have collaborated on a joint video campaign. Outcome Health will run the videos on their screens in tens of thousands of doctors’ offices across the country. Ethan will also post a number of blogs about AYA vaccination over the coming months.

Advertisements

“Millions of adolescents and young adults in the U.S. are not fully vaccinated and not even aware that they’re missing recommended vaccines,” said Judy Klein, President of Unity Consortium. “We are working with Ethan to amplify his voice.  He is all about galvanizing teens to do their homework on the power of vaccination to protect themselves against preventable diseases, and the imperative of being caught up on all missing immunizations. Outcome Health is a valued and exceptional partner in broadly disseminating this message.”

Unity also developed a first-of-its-kind campaign (VAX@16) emphasizing the 16-year-old well-visit and the vaccines that can help protect teens as they head into adulthood. Unity’s VAX@16 campaign aims to increase awareness among parents, teens, and health care providers of the vaccinations recommended for 16-year-olds, including Meningococcal ACWY (MenACWY), Meningococcal B (MenB), and flu (seasonally). 

Advertisements

Ethan commented, “We each have the power to protect ourselves from serious and potentially dangerous illnesses like meningitis and the measles.  We grew up learning to wear a helmet when we rode a bike in case we fall and to wear a seat belt in casewe are in an accident.  What about getting a vaccine in casewe are exposed to a lethal illness?” 

The Voices of AYA campaign featuring Ethan Lindenberger resourcesare available on Unity’s website and include videos that feature Ethan and Dr. Laura Offutt, Lead for Unity’s Teen Advisory Council.

Advertisements

About Unity Consortium

Unity Consortium is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that brings together diverse groups that share a common and passionate interest in maintaining life-long health, with a focus on adolescent and young adult preventive healthcare and immunization.Unity members and liaisons represent professional/trade organizations, coalitions/educational organizations, public health, providers, technology and communications organizations, and vaccine manufacturers.

Advertisements

Media Contact:

Debbie Kanterman

Communications, UnityTM Consortium

Email:debbiekanterman@yahoo.com

Phone: 914-512-0277

Advertisements

Harvard University to Launch Center for Autism Research

Advertisements

Autism and related disorders—a constellation of neurodevelopmental conditions affecting one in 59 children in the United States alone—have become one of modern medicine’s most confounding mysteries. The condition is believed to arise from the complex interplay between genes and environment, yet its basic biology remains largely a black box.

Now, a new research effort at Harvard University led by Harvard Medical School is poised to identify the biologic roots and molecular changes that give rise to autism and related disorders with the goal of informing the development of better diagnostic tools and new therapies. Harvard University has received a $20 million gift from philanthropists Lisa Yang and Hock Tan, an alumnus of Harvard Business School, to establish The Hock E. Tan and K. Lisa Yang Center for Autism Research at Harvard Medical School. The latest gift brings the total autism-related research funding provided by Yang and Tan to nearly $70 million.

Advertisements

The center will serve as a hub that brings together the diverse expertise of scientists and clinicians working throughout Harvard University, Harvard Medical School and its affiliated hospitals.

“There is an urgent need to understand the fundamental biology of autism,” said Michael Greenberg, chair of the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School and the center’s inaugural faculty leader. “I strongly believe that the multidisciplinary expertise convened by this center will propel us into a new era of autism research, enhancing our understanding of the condition and yielding critical new insights into its causes. This generous gift will be transformative for the field.”

Advertisements

Working under the premise that autism’s complexity demands the cross-pollination of diverse expertise across different modes of scientific inquiry, the center will encompass the efforts of basic, translational and clinical scientists from the entire Harvard ecosystem. The center will have its administrative home within the Harvard Brain Science Initiative, which brings together researchers from Harvard Medical School and its affiliated hospitals as well as from the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Neuroscience has reached a unique inflection point. Advances such as single-cell analysis and optogenetics, coupled with an unprecedented ability to visualize molecular shifts down to the minutest level, will enable today’s researchers to tackle a disorder as dauntingly complex as autism,” said Harvard Medical School Dean George Q. Daley.

“Medical history has taught us that truly transformative therapies flow only from a clear understanding of the fundamental biology that underlies a condition,” Daley added. “This gift will allow our researchers to generate critical insights about autism and related disorders.”

Advertisements

Investigators at the new Harvard University center will collaborate with peer researchers at MIT and complement efforts already underway at The Hock E. Tan and K. Lisa Yang Center for Autism Research at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, with the unique strengths of each institution converging toward a shared goal: understanding the roots of autism, explaining the condition’s behavior and evolution and translating those insights into novel approaches to treat its symptoms.

“In a short time, the Tan-Yang Center at the McGovern Institute has supported groundbreaking research we believe will change our understanding of autism,” said Robert Desimone, the director of the sibling center at MIT. “We look forward to joining forces with the new center at Harvard, to greatly accelerate the pace of autism-related research.”

“We are excited and hopeful that these sibling centers at Harvard and MIT—two powerhouses of biomedical research—will continue to collaborate in a synergistic way and bring about critical new insights to our understanding of autism,” Yang said. Yang is a former investment banker who has devoted much of her time to mental health advocacy. Tan is president and CEO of Broadcom, a global infrastructure technology company. 

Advertisements

Autism-spectrum disorders—neurodevelopmental conditions that typically emerge in the first few years of life—are marked by a cluster of symptoms, impaired social interactions and compromised communication skills. Yet exactly what portion of these cases is rooted in genetic mutations and how they are influenced by environmental factors is an area of lingering uncertainty. Another key area of uncertainty is how much of autism’s fundamental features arise in the brain and what influence organs and systems outside of the brain might have.

Two of the new center’s initial areas of inquiry will address these critical gaps in knowledge.

One group of researchers will focus on understanding precisely what goes awry during critical windows in the first two years of life—a period marked by rapid brain development, great neuroplasticity and intense wiring of the brain’s circuits. This is also the typical window of autism diagnosis. The scientists will try to understand what molecular, cellular or neural-circuitry changes underlie autism-fueling processes during this stage. Identifying such critical changes can help illuminate how experiences modulate brain development in individuals with autism.

Advertisements

Another group of researchers will examine the role of factors arising from organs and organ systems outside the brain that may drive autism risk. For example, the peripheral nervous system—made up of nerve cells throughout the body that act as nodes to collect and transmit signals to the brain—has emerged as a central player in the development of autism.

Heightened sensitivity to even light touch is a common feature in autism and one of the disorder’s many perplexing symptoms. Recent research from neurobiologists and geneticists at Harvard Medical School has not only identified the molecular changes that give rise to heightened touch sensitivity in autism-spectrum disorders but also points to a possible treatment for the condition.