Tag: donations

Animals can lie to themselves too

Like Humans, Crayfish Talk a Tough Game

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Self-deception like this seems very human. Now, thanks to a recent study led by an Arizona State University biologist, for the first time we know that it happens in the animal kingdom, too.

Crayfish are some of the most aggressive creatures on earth. They fight with big claws capable of doing real damage. But sometimes there’s not much muscle under the bravado.

“What males are doing is making as little crappy muscle as possible, which is energetically saving,” said Michael Angilletta, a biology professor in the School of Life Sciences.

It’s like buying designer knockoffs. You save a lot of money, and most people can’t tell the difference. In the case of crayfish, you make a big claw without much muscle, and you put crappy muscle on it to boot. Everyone sees you wave your big claw and they presume that you’re a powerful crayfish.

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“Since they signal to each other before fighting, this is a way they can convince someone to back down without fighting,” Angilletta said. “Importantly, this only works if there’s enough crayfish out there that have big claws that are actually strong. If you accidentally fight one of those and call a bluff, you’re going to lose a claw.”

In the crayfish world, losing a claw is a disaster: It takes up to two years for a claw to regenerate. In the meantime, no one is mating with anyone who has a puny claw. 

Angilletta and his co-authors have been studying self-deception in crayfish for about 10 years. In 2006 they accidentally discovered that many crayfish with big claws were quite weak. There was about a tenfold variation.

“You would go, ‘Oh, this (pinch) is going to hurt,’ but it doesn’t hurt at all,” Angilletta said. “The question is are they not trying, or are they really not strong? And it’s repeatable from day after day with the same individuals.”

They combined mathematical modeling with an experiment to show that crayfish meet the criteria for self-deception. This approach opens up the possibility of studying self-deception in nonhuman animals, without being able to talk to them. They used 97 adult males, staging fights between 20 select crayfish and 77 opponents.

“How do we know what a crayfish would do if it knows whether it’s weak or it’s strong?” Angilletta asked. “If it knows that (it has a weak claw), it should actually be less aggressive.”

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It might escalate up to the point of a fight, and then run away. The probability that a crayfish engaged in a fight depended on two factors: the relative size of its claws and the expected difference in force. How do they know how strong (or not) they are? Crayfish use claws to deter predators, defend territory and capture prey. They have a pretty good idea of how strong their own claws are. They’re also skilled at assessing their size versus an opponent’s. They can even recognize previous opponents.

So natural selection has given them an ability to detect size and identity. Given that they have those abilities, it naturally follows that they have an ability to gauge strength when knowing it will improve decisions.

“In our population of crayfish, deceptive signalers largely ignored their own strength when escalating or evading aggression,” Angilletta said. “If this benefit of heightened aggression outweighs any long-term cost, natural selection should favor individuals who escalate aggression through self-deception.”

In other words, they buy into their own bluff. Angilletta teaches a biology course on human behavior called “Why people steal, cheat, and lie,” which explores the ecological and evolutionary causes of selfishness and cooperation in human societies.

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“What’s new about this study is that if you’re ever in a situation where I’m lying to you, there’s also a possibility I’m selling my lie exceptionally well because I’ve convinced myself that it’s true,” he said. “That’s because of self-deception. It’s very common in psychology but it’s not really that much in biology because we’re usually thinking about nonhuman animals and we don’t know what they’re thinking. We have a hard time understanding what they know and don’t know.”

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The paper was published last summer in Behavioral Ecology.

Video Credits:  Ken Fagan, ASU

Photo Credit: Charlie Leight, ASU

About ASU

Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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Egoists (a book of supermen)

Free book for autism research

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Donations

$1.00

By F. Guzzardi

This new edition of Huneker’s book that saw his first appearance in 1909, is wholly devoted to those modern poets, philosophers and prose masters whose writings embody the individualistic idea as opposed to altruistic and
socialistic sentiments.

Amply discussed are Stendhal, whose cult, recently revived on the Continent, is steadily growing; Maurice Barres, French Academician; Anatole France, blithe pagan and delicious ironist; Max Stimer, the forerunner of Nietzsche; The mystics, Ernest Hello new to American readers and William Blake. Much new historical material can be found in the studies of Charles Baudelaire and Gustave Flaubert.

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The hitherto unpublished letter of the novelist, along with an original page proof of “Madame Bovary,” corrected by his own hand, will prove of interest to his admirers. That brilliant virtuoso of the French language, J. K.
Huysmans, forms the subject of a chapter, while certain phases of Nietzsche, including his famous published biography, “Ecce Homo”, and Ibsen dramas, are also subjects of discussion. Altogether the book represents the most mature critical and analytical thought of the author applied to some of the most interesting literary characters in the modern Europe of 1909.

IN VINO VERITART FOR AUTISM

In Vino Veritart is a journey through the multi-artistic genius of Roberto Sironi and the poetic sensibility of Mariagrazia Pia. A journey through the world of wine and its love drifts through colors and images imbued with tannic emotions, sometimes tender, sensual and dreamy. It is an original work in a visionary and futuristic artistic form where the talent of the writer is combined with the skill of the painter.

In vino veritart in Dubai sold by Ingram at the World Trade Center Mall, Al Danah, Abu Dhabi

International Poetry Festival of Milan – 11 May 2019 –
Presentation of the project “Love notes of a bottled humankind” (Italian)

in vino veritart solicits donations for Autism society of Florida, through its publisher Hoffmann & Hoffmann. The Autism Society of Florida is a statewide affiliate of the Autism Society of America and is your best source of information and support, a nonprofit 501(c)3 comprised entirely of volunteers, mostly parents and people with autism.

Autism society of Florida

Autism20, is only echoes of this campaign donations along with the art book "In Vino Veritart" by Roberto Sironi and Mariagrazia Pia. Donations at Autism society of Florida are exclusively in this link and cannot be accumulated with sales of the digital book or in other forms.

$1.00

Fill out the form below, or email info@autismfl.org

First Large-Scale Study of Universal Screening for Autism Raises Critical Questions about Accuracy, Equity

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Researchers urge continued screening for all toddlers, while recommending changes to M-CHAT screening method to improve accuracy, address disparities

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Newswise — Philadelphia, September 27, 2019 –

In the first large, real-world study of universal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that the most widely used and researched screening tool is less accurate than shown in previous studies conducted in research laboratory settings. The new study also revealed significant disparities in detecting early autism symptoms in minority, urban and low-income children. The findings were published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends screening all toddlers for ASD at their 18- and 24-month primary care check-ups using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers with Follow-Up (M-CHAT/F), a two-stage parent survey to determine whether a child may have autism, with the follow-up designed to eliminate false positives. However, most studies to evaluate the accuracy of the M-CHAT/F have been conducted in research settings rather than in real-world clinical settings. Therefore, very little was known about screening in the recommended primary care setting, nor about longer-term outcomes for children who screened negative on the M-CHAT/F. The CHOP study is the first to look at outcomes of truly universal screening in a real-world primary care setting.

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“As part of a large pediatric network implementing universal screening, we found ourselves in a unique position to find answers to critical questions about the accuracy of the M-CHAT, and to determine how many children are missed by early, universal screening,” said lead author Whitney Guthrie, PhD, a clinical psychologist specializing in early diagnosis at CHOP’s Center for Autism Research. “Early intervention has been shown to improve outcomes, potentially into adulthood. We know that early and accurate screening and diagnosis is the crucial first step in helping children access those effective, autism-specific therapies.”

The CHOP research team studied the electronic health records (EHR) of 25,999 patients screened in primary care using the M-CHAT/F between the ages of 16 and 26 months, and systematically followed these children until 4 through 8 years of age using the EHR. Ninety-one percent of these children were screened using the M-CHAT/F, meaning that nearly universal screening of all children in primary care was achieved.

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The study showed that the M-CHAT/F detected only about 40% of children who went on to be diagnosed with ASD. However, children who screened positive were diagnosed seven months earlier than those who screened negative, suggesting that early screening may facilitate early intervention. Overall, 2.2% of children in the study were ultimately diagnosed with ASD, which is consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates nationally.

“Although our findings reveal significant shortcomings in current screening tools, we want to be clear that we are not recommending that pediatricians stop universal screening,” said Guthrie. “Instead, clinicians should continue to screen using the M-CHAT/F, while being aware that this screening tool does miss some children with ASD. Any clinical or parental concerns should be taken seriously, and warrant continued surveillance even if a child screens negative on the M-CHAT/F. And of course, a screen positive on the M-CHAT/F warrants referral so that children with ASD can be diagnosed and receive early intervention.

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Autism Speaks

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“Pediatricians should also be aware of disparities in screening practices and results in children of color and from low-income backgrounds.”

The CHOP study found that the 9% of children who did not receive screening at 18 or 24 months were disproportionately from racial minority groups; from non-English speaking households; and from households with lower median income and who receive Medicaid. When screening was administered, these same children were more likely to receive a false positive result. The M-CHAT was also less accurate in girls than in boys.

“Persistent racial and economic disparities in autism screening and diagnosis are a cause for great concern, and are consistent with previous research showing that black and Hispanic children tend to be diagnosed years later than white children,” said co-author Kate Wallis, MD, MPH, a developmental pediatrician and researcher at CHOP’s PolicyLab who is also studying disparities in referrals for autism services. “This study revealed important limitations and provides us with new knowledge that we can use to make critical improvements to autism screening tools and screening processes, so pediatricians can properly detect and support more children with autism and reduce disparities in diagnosis and care.”

Guthrie et al, “Accuracy of Autism Screening in a Large Pediatric Network.” Pediatrics, online 27 September 2019. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2019-0925.

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About Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation’s first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children’s Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide.  Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country.  In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 564-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.chop.edu