Pandemic Effects on Relationships

Expert commentary from Paula Pietromonaco, professor emerita at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, whose primary research focus is to understand the processes through which interactions in marital relationships shape each partner’s emotional and physical health. A key component of close, well-functioning romantic relationships is that individuals see their partners as accepting, concerned with their welfare, understanding,… Read More Pandemic Effects on Relationships

Music May Be an Effective Guide For Understanding Human Brain Activity

NSF grant supports research to develop new models to better understand the brain TROY, N.Y. — When Sergio Pequito thinks about the brain, he visualizes a piano. The keys represent different parts of the brain, and the pressure applied by the pianist’s fingers represents the outside stimuli that promote brain functions.  Just as notes and… Read More Music May Be an Effective Guide For Understanding Human Brain Activity

Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness

In a new discovery, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have detected widespread inflammation in the brains of veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Illness (GWI). These findings, published online in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity on February 3, could serve as a guidepost for identifying and developing new therapies for people with GWI, as well as… Read More Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness

Exercise Improve Video Game Performance?

Time spent playing video games is often seen as time stolen from physical activities. Research has shown that exercise has many physical and cognitive benefits. But what if exercise could benefit video game performance as well? A new study led by neuroscientist Dr. Marc Roig and his research team from the School of Physical &… Read More Exercise Improve Video Game Performance?

‘How I Fell for My Field’

For Valentine’s Day, we asked faculty and staff at nine CSU campuses to tell us how their lifelong love affair with their discipline began. As the adage goes, “Choose a job you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” The CSU is lucky to be replete with faculty and staff across its… Read More ‘How I Fell for My Field’

Happy wife, Happy life

A happy partner leads to a healthier future Science now supports the saying, “happy wife, happy life.” Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together.  “We spend a… Read More Happy wife, Happy life

Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

“Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and many other types of mental illness, are diseases of the brain and should be treated and studied as such,” say Johns Hopkins researchers. Does this statement seem a bit obvious and not exactly rocket science? Although it may, this isn’t how the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) — the… Read More Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

Too Much of a Good Thing? 😜

That Italian restaurant with the excellent linguini that you’ve indulged in so often you can no longer face a meal there. The conference with brilliant but endless keynotes: You start the day full of enthusiasm, but by the fourth breakout you’re flagging. The action movie that has you on the edge of your seat for… Read More Too Much of a Good Thing? 😜

Sleep-Deprived Due to the Super Bowl? 40% of U.S. Adults Usually Are

Fun on Super Bowl Sunday can lead to a tired Monday for many. In a new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), nearly 40% of U.S. adults said they are more tired than usual the Monday after the Super Bowl. With pre-game entertainment, high-profile commercials, a star-studded halftime show and high-stakes football,… Read More Sleep-Deprived Due to the Super Bowl? 40% of U.S. Adults Usually Are