Category: goverament

Combating Human Trafficking

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Photo by Jordan Whitt

Each year, more than 40 million men, women and children are trafficked worldwide. It manifests in numerous forms and has grown into a multi-billion-dollar illegal enterprise that is difficult to detect, prosecute and examine. Risk analysis is a critical tool for combating human trafficking and is central to informing global policy recommendations and assisting with targeted local and organizational efforts. Several studies will be presented during the Addressing Human Trafficking Risk symposium at the 2019 SRA Annual Meeting at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia.

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Many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) work to reduce human trafficking but often fail to understand the context and environment before taking action, resulting in ineffective and sometimes detrimental policies. JD Caddell, U.S. Military Academy, studied how girls were lured and trafficked by reframing the situation as a supply chain and looking at both supply and demand.

Caddell’s study, “Using system dynamics to set strategic priorities to address human trafficking,” revealed that NGO’s actions aimed solely at removing girls from the system yields few long-term benefits and creates more victims in the long run while raid and rescue operations only yields short-term gains.

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“Many organizations use raid and rescue models because they provide “results,” in terms of girls saved, which provides validation and a mechanism for future NGO fundraising,” states Caddell. “However, our study showed that focusing on the demand side of the problem is more likely to generate large scale and sustainable progress.”

Because human trafficking is hidden, illegal and dangerous, it is difficult to gather the data needed to develop effective quantitative models and their response to interventions. Kayse Lee Maass, Ph.D., Northeastern University, has been working with survivors, law enforcement personnel and social scientists to better understand the structure and operations of trafficking networks, how they adapt and the dependencies between their cyber and social networks.

Maass’s study, “Modeling operations of human trafficking networks for effective interdiction,” provides non-profits, service providers, policy makers and other anti-trafficking stakeholders with decision support tools to effectively allocate resources to disrupt networks and ensure survivors have access to support services.

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Similarly, Julia Coxen, University of Michigan, has approached the problem by decomposing the risks of human trafficking into the risks to public health, to security and to the community. Coxen’s study, “Risk analysis as a critical tool for human trafficking,” helps decision-makers better understand the complexities of human trafficking. The study also highlights the need for more evidence-based and quantitative risk analysis research to combat this global issue that impacts all levels of society.

** Coxen, Caddell, and Maass are available for media interviews at the 2019 SRA Annual Meeting. Please contact Natalie Judd at natalie@bigvoicecomm.com for all interview requests.

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Immigration Issues at U.S.-Mexico Border

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New Brunswick, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2019) – Rutgers scholar Camilla Townsend is available to discuss shifting perspectives of the U.S.-Mexico border.

“How we think about the border has transformed over time. In the first half of the 20th century, the U.S. government worked hard to encourage the migration northward of many thousands of needed Mexican workers. It was only in the second half of the century that the government’s goal shifted to stopping the migrations,” said Townsend, whose new fall course Wars, Wayfarers, and the Wall: A History of the U.S.-Mexican Border encourages critical thinking about hotly contested issues such as the border wall and U.S. Supreme Court decision to allow asylum-seekers at the U.S.-Mexico border to be turned away. “What was once a welcomed migration of people has now become this thing to be ‘defended’ and it has caused a rift in the population. I think the next generation of voters is going to have their work cut out for them this next election season.”

Townsend, a Distinguished Professor of history at Rutgers–New Brunswick, is an expert in Latin-American history and the author of Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History. She can be reached by contacting Cynthia Medina at  c.medina@rutgers.edu.

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Broadcast interviews: Rutgers University–New Brunswick has broadcast-quality TV and radio studios available for remote live or taped interviews with Rutgers experts. For more information, contact Cynthia Medina c.medina@rutgers.edu

ABOUT RUTGERS—NEW BRUNSWICK

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Rutgers University–New Brunswick is where Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, began more than 250 years ago. Ranked among the world’s top 60 universities, Rutgers’s flagship university is a leading public research institution and a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. It is home to internationally acclaimed faculty and has 12 degree-granting schools and a Division I Athletics program. It is the Big Ten Conference’s most diverse university. Through its community of teachers, scholars, artists, scientists, and healers, Rutgers is equipped as never before to transform lives.

Autism CARES Act of 2019

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WASHINGTON, Sept. 19, 2019 /PRNewswire/ —

Autism Speaks applauds the final passage of the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support Act of 2019 (Autism CARES Act of 2019) (H.R.1058). The bill now goes to the President’s desk for his signature. Autism CARES is the foundation of the federal government’s efforts around autism, serving as the primary source of federal funding for autism research, services, training and monitoring.

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The bipartisan, bicameral legislation received broad support with 173 house members and 41 senators having signed on as co-sponsors of the legislation. Autism Speaks is grateful to have worked hand-in-hand with the measure’s congressional champions and advocates across the country in order to ensure support for the life-enhancing research and high-quality services authorized under the Autism CARES Act.

“Autism Speaks, alongside the millions of people with autism and their families, celebrates the passage of the Autism CARES Act of 2019,” said Autism Speaks President and CEO Angela Geiger. “Thanks to the leadership of Senator Bob Menendez, Senator Michael Enzi, Congressman Chris Smith and Congressman Mike Doyle, this legislation ensures sustained funding to better support people with autism across the spectrum and at every stage of life.”

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The CDC estimates that 1 in 59 U.S. children have autism, according to surveillance and prevalence studies authorized by Autism CARES. A recent study by Autism Speaks researchers also found that children with autism have nearly four times higher odds of having unmet health care needs compared to children without disabilities. “We know autism is a lifelong condition and these unmet needs can and often do continue into adulthood,” said Autism Speaks Senior Vice President of Advocacy Stuart Spielman. “The Autism CARES Act of 2019 not only renews federal support for existing autism research and programs but also expands these activities, placing an increased emphasis on reducing health disparities and improving services throughout the life span.”

Under the authority of the Autism CARES Act of 2014 and predecessor legislation, over $3.1 billion has been dedicated for autism to the National Institute of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) since 2006. The Autism CARES Act of 2019 authorizes more than $1.8 billion in funding over the next five years. This funding primarily supports autism research grants awarded by NIH which advance the scientific understanding of autism, expand efforts to develop treatments for medical conditions often associated with autism and address the needs of people affected by it. The NIH Autism Centers of Excellence also fosters collaboration within and among research centers, increasing the power and efficiency of their efforts.

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The Autism CARES Act of 2019 also reauthorizes and supports numerous programs across the country focused on ensuring high-quality services for people with autism. Through 52 Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Other Related Disabilities (LEND) programs and 12 Developmental Behavioral Pediatric Training Programs, the legislation has and will continue to enhance education, early detection and intervention activities at HRSA through the training of future leaders and healthcare professionals. Likewise, collaborative programs such as the Autism Intervention Research Network on Physical Health (AIR-P) will continue to help translate research into improved care and tangible resources for families and clinicians.

Under Autism CARES, the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) is empowered to advise on federal autism activities, and tasks the federal government with surveying and reporting to Congress on the current landscape of autism services. The 2014 legislation resulted in a report to Congress on young adults with autism and the challenges related to transitioning from school-based services to those available during adulthood. The 2019 legislation mandates another report, this time focused on the health and well-being of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, emphasizing their needs throughout the life span.

Autism Speaks looks forward to working with Congress and its community partners to deliver on the promise of Autism CARES through renewed appropriations for these programs. 

SOURCE Autism Speaks