Music therapy

WRITTEN BY Kathleen M. Howland Kathleen M. Howland is a certified music therapist and licensed speech language pathologist and holds a Ph.D from the University of South Carolina. Music therapy, clinical discipline in which music is used to address nonmusical goals. Therapists use music listening, songwriting, improvisation, and lyric analysis as means of fulfilling goals in movement, cognition, speech… Read More Music therapy

Back to School?

AU Pandemic Expert Provides Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 and Return to School Newswise — Florida Atlantic University’s Terry Adirim, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., chair and professor of pediatrics, Integrative Medical Sciences Department, and senior associate dean for clinical affairs, Schmidt College of Medicine, provides answers to some of the most frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19… Read More Back to School?

$2.3m Grant to Fund New Direction in Autism Spectrum Disorders Research at KU

LAWRENCE — While much research has been devoted to the social and communication issues that define autism spectrum disorders (ASD), much less is known about motor deficits that affect the majority of, if not all, individuals with ASD. These include not only repetitive behaviors such as hand flapping and rocking, but also problems with both… Read More $2.3m Grant to Fund New Direction in Autism Spectrum Disorders Research at KU

Can a pathological narcissist ashamed of or feel remorse?

Notwithstanding that, my advice is not to even try to understand the narcissist but to run away and disconnect any contact This is the question many victims of these individuals ask themselves. But the mistake they make and we all make it – is that you think narcissists are fundamentally like you, only that they… Read More Can a pathological narcissist ashamed of or feel remorse?

The refrigerator mother theory

Refrigerator mother theory is a theory that autism is caused by a lack of maternal warmth. Current research indicates that genetic factors are suspected in the cause of autism By F. Guzzardi Origins of theory In his 1943 paper that first identified autism, Leo Kanner called attention to what appeared to him as a lack of warmth among the mothers of autistic children. In… Read More The refrigerator mother theory

The soul in love

Sometimes you know, you wake up as if we were drowning, you pull your head out of the water and you realize that you are in your usual bedroom with your usual TV on, with your usual life hanging on the wall. Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash Sometimes I say, I know it is not easy but,… Read More The soul in love

A Natural Lover

We certainly don’t need doctrines, religions or anything else that teaches us to love, because this is part of us. By F. Guzzardi Doctor Helen Fisher claims to have studied the brain Brown 75 people over 75 people who were madly in love into a brain scan 17/15 and 17 who are in love long-term… Read More A Natural Lover

Gods are not empathetic

Empathetic animals Sometimes I wonder what it must be like to feel empathy for others, to experience only emotions related to anger, fear, envy. Still, there is a very high percentage of people in the world that are almost totally empathetic. Sometimes I think that if there was a God or some other higher identity,… Read More Gods are not empathetic

Stuff your kids with love

Autistic children are like all children, hungry for attention and love. An attention that sometimes we parents do not know how to give, because, perhaps too busy with our troubles, working with relationships, we do not notice what we are losing. We lose the smile, their joy when they reach a desired goal that is… Read More Stuff your kids with love

Codependent: A magnet for the Narcissist

 “This post, is about to help you, arm you-selves against the narcissist that it bump up against in yur lifetime and if you’re codependent or you’re an empatic you are a magnet for this people! ” The feel that other people feel, and that ability although beautiful, help us be really human and allows us to… Read More Codependent: A magnet for the Narcissist

Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood

UC Davis study found gender differences in autism severity changes During early childhood, girls with autism tend to show greater reduction and less rise in their autism symptom severity than boys with autism, a UC Davis MIND Institute study has found. Early childhood is a period of substantial brain growth with critical ability for learning and development.… Read More Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood

A Narcissist Thing

“One thing you need to know about narcissists: living with a pathologically narcissistic person in your life is very painful, far from just being benignly in love with themselves.”… Read More A Narcissist Thing

Five things about a Narcissistic Mother

Although we can consciously recognize the lack of love and our unhappiness within our family of origin, it is unlikely that we will be able to see the ways and behaviors that we have adopted to face and manage them. It is much more likely that you will see your adult behaviors as deriving from… Read More Five things about a Narcissistic Mother

Conspiracy theories about Bill Gates

by Fabrizio Catalfamo His name is Roger Stone, a former Donald Trump collaborator. The allegations about Bill Gates, Microchips and Virus seem to have started from him. The offending sentence would be: “microchipping people so we can tell ‘whether you’ve been tested’.” A sentence said lightly and taken up by some conspiracy theorists was enough… Read More Conspiracy theories about Bill Gates

Your Narcissistic Mother Hates Your Body, and Here’s Why

Whether she fat-shames you or micromanages your appearance, it’s all about her Julie L. Hall is the author of The Narcissist in Your Life: Recognizing the Patterns and Learning to Break Free from Hachette Books. She is the founder of The Narcissist Family Files, an international resource for narcissistic abuse trauma understanding and recovery, and she assists clients around the… Read More Your Narcissistic Mother Hates Your Body, and Here’s Why

Time to Back to Sicily

Back to the future, it would be better as a title, because … it is true, I miss the fire of Etna and the Mediterranean beaches steeped in Greek and Roman, Arab and Norman stories. The culture hidden in every corner and in every alley of cities and villages.When we were kids we moved to… Read More Time to Back to Sicily

Studying pandemic’s effects on sexual health and well-being

One in five adults in the United States report they have experienced change – mostly a decrease – in their sexual behavior during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.   The study, co-authored by Devon Hensel, associate research professor of pediatrics at the IU School… Read More Studying pandemic’s effects on sexual health and well-being

Pandemic Effects on Relationships

Expert commentary from Paula Pietromonaco, professor emerita at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, whose primary research focus is to understand the processes through which interactions in marital relationships shape each partner’s emotional and physical health. A key component of close, well-functioning romantic relationships is that individuals see their partners as accepting, concerned with their welfare, understanding,… Read More Pandemic Effects on Relationships

7 Tips of healthy eating

Stay-at-home orders from government officials due to the COVID-19 pandemic have forced us to quickly adapt to a new normal, especially when it comes to eating. Restaurant dining rooms are closed, grocery shopping can be challenging, many parents are tasked with serving meals while working from home, and families who relied on school meals are… Read More 7 Tips of healthy eating

COVID-19 and the power of music

Music can help regulate emotion, make us feel connected COLUMBUS, Ohio – In Italy, people isolated by the COVID-19 pandemic stood on apartment balconies, singing “Bella Ciao” – “goodnight, beautiful” – together into the night. Musicians in a Dutch symphony filmed themselves playing Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” individually – then assembled a compilation video titled “From Us, For… Read More COVID-19 and the power of music

4 tips for business survival … but I put 5

While CEOs and executives are struggling to cope with the fallout of Covid-19, an expert on business internationally renowned growth, Jana Matthews Professor of UniSA is encouraging companies to take a step back and carefully consider their activity before making any decision radical about their future. “The fact that a company survive in uncertain times… Read More 4 tips for business survival … but I put 5

Love Notes…

In these days of world suffering, a touch of love notes to cheer the heart.Published by Hoffmann & Hoffmann with the contribution of Blurb, a new edition of “In vino Veritart” The art book by Roberto Sironi and Mariagrazia Pia. The novelty lies not only in the usual beauty of Sironi’s painting and in Mariagrazia… Read More Love Notes…

Mental Well-being During Social Distancing

Managing mental well being is critical in times of uncertainty and unpredictability. One common coping mechanism is to connect in-person with friends or family because isolation can negatively impact those experiencing depression and anxiety. Amid concerns over COVID-19, however, that recommendation conflicts with health and safety instructions on social distancing. Dr. Tonya Hansel and Dr.… Read More Mental Well-being During Social Distancing

LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus

LA JOLLA, CA—Within two months, SARS-CoV-2, a previously unknown coronavirus, has raced around globe, infecting over a 100,000 people with numbers continuing to rise quickly. Effective countermeasures require helpful tools to monitor viral spread and understand how the immune system responds to the virus. Publishing in the March 16, 2020, online issue of Host, Cell and Microbe,… Read More LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus

Equal parenting rights for same-sex couples

Same-sex marriage may have been given the green (or rainbow) light in many countries around the world, but it appears there are still some entrenched attitudes in society when it comes to same-sex parenting.  Misconceptions about the impact on children raised by same-sex parents are harmful both in a social and legal sense, says University… Read More Equal parenting rights for same-sex couples

What does self-quarantine mean?

As people wrestle with spring travel, many may choose – or be asked – to self-quarantine for a period of time to help deter the spread of COVID-19.… Read More What does self-quarantine mean?

Endangered species on supermarket shelves

Lab reveals the surprising prevalence of European Eel in Hong Kong’s food supply Imagine purchasing products from your local grocer, only to find out that those products are comprised of critically endangered species! That’s what a team from the University of Hong Kong, Division of Ecology and Biodiversity has recently discovered on Hong Kong supermarket… Read More Endangered species on supermarket shelves

The running factor

Millions of runners around the world lace up they’re running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers. The birth of Parkrun in 2004 – now an international activity with more than 20 countries involved — is credited with a sharp rise in the popularity of running in the past… Read More The running factor

Does smoking increase your risk for dementia and cognitive decline?

Scientists from the Uniformed Services University (USU), Emory University and the University of Vermont have found that cigarette smoking is linked to increased lesions in the brain’s white matter, called white matter hyperintensities.  White matter hyperintensities, detected by MRI scan, are associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. These findings may help explain the link… Read More Does smoking increase your risk for dementia and cognitive decline?

When chronic pain leads to depression in children

When chronic pain keeps children from being active and social, it’s no surprise that anxiety and depression can become unwelcome playmates. Unfortunately, this scenario can become a vicious cycle—not only can pain lead to depression and anxiety, but worsening depression and anxiety can worsen pain perception. Overall, about 5 to 20 percent of children live with… Read More When chronic pain leads to depression in children

How to prepare in the event of a pandemic

As COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, becomes more prevalent around the world, University of Alabama at Birmingham experts share tips to help you prepare yourself, your family and your home should the virus continue to gain momentum. What is COVID-19? Human coronaviruses are the second most common cause of colds and generally cause mild to moderate symptoms.… Read More How to prepare in the event of a pandemic

Spending time in nature reduces stress

ITHACA, N.Y. – New research from an interdisciplinary Cornell team has found that as little as 10 minutes in a natural setting can help college students feel happier and lessen the effects of both physical and mental stress. The research, published Jan. 14 in Frontiers in Psychology, is part of a larger examination of “nature therapy” and… Read More Spending time in nature reduces stress

January Science Snapshots

In order to take these mesmerizing microscopy images, the team carefully demineralized small bits of T. rex bone to liberate the preserved vessel tissue inside. The sample used in this study came from the femur of the famous, nearly complete fossil specimen known as “the Nation’s T. rex,” which is currently on display at the… Read More January Science Snapshots

Food Allergic Kids

Transferring knowledge of food allergies, not fear, to children is crucial A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) discusses the difficulties faced by parents of children with food allergies in not transferring their own anxieties to their children. “Food… Read More Food Allergic Kids

Top 10 Autism Studies of 2019

Top10 studies from MIND explore early interventions and new school transitions for children with autism On Jan. 27, Autism Speaks announced its annual selection of studies that “advance its mission of enhancing lives today and accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.” Three of the top 10 autism studies of 2019 came from UC Davis… Read More Top 10 Autism Studies of 2019

Pretrial publicity for high profile cases like Harvey Weinstein

If you see something in the news, can you unsee it or forget it? When it comes to pretrial publicity, conventional wisdom says “no.” That is why defense attorneys for high-profile clients like Harvey Weinstein or Lori Loughlin, in order to ensure a fair trial, argue for moving a trial’s location or reject potential jurors… Read More Pretrial publicity for high profile cases like Harvey Weinstein

Music May Be an Effective Guide For Understanding Human Brain Activity

NSF grant supports research to develop new models to better understand the brain TROY, N.Y. — When Sergio Pequito thinks about the brain, he visualizes a piano. The keys represent different parts of the brain, and the pressure applied by the pianist’s fingers represents the outside stimuli that promote brain functions.  Just as notes and… Read More Music May Be an Effective Guide For Understanding Human Brain Activity

Borderline Personality Disorder Research and Treatment

Borderline personality disorder (BPD), characterized by pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image and behavior, afflicts approximately 2 percent of the general population and is a leading cause of suicide. Eight to 10 percent of individuals with this disorder take their own lives. “A common misapprehension by family, friends and often by clinicians is that… Read More Borderline Personality Disorder Research and Treatment

Saving Mother and Child

Multidisciplinary teams of UCI oncologists and maternal-fetal specialists utilize scientific advances to treat patients with high-risk pregnancies Five-year-old Emlee jumps high, runs fast and likes to pirouette around the living room in her white ballet slippers. Her mom, Karalayne Maglinte, calls her a miracle. Indeed, Emlee is the embodiment of the word: She’s one of… Read More Saving Mother and Child

Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness

In a new discovery, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have detected widespread inflammation in the brains of veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Illness (GWI). These findings, published online in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity on February 3, could serve as a guidepost for identifying and developing new therapies for people with GWI, as well as… Read More Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness

Teens spend too much time gaming?

Nearly 9 in 10 parents say teens spend too much time gaming but many mistaken about child’s video game behavior Eighty-six percent of parents agree that teens spend too much time gaming, but many may be mistaken about the extent of their own child’s video game habits, a new national poll suggests. Parents also report… Read More Teens spend too much time gaming?

Exercise Improve Video Game Performance?

Time spent playing video games is often seen as time stolen from physical activities. Research has shown that exercise has many physical and cognitive benefits. But what if exercise could benefit video game performance as well? A new study led by neuroscientist Dr. Marc Roig and his research team from the School of Physical &… Read More Exercise Improve Video Game Performance?

The “Firewalkers” of Karoo: Dinosaurs and Other Animals Left Tracks in a “Land of Fire”

Several groups of reptiles persisted in Jurassic Africa even as volcanism ruined their habitat In southern Africa, dinosaurs and synapsids, a group of animals that includes mammals and their closest fossil relatives, survived in a “land of fire” at the start of an Early Jurassic mass extinction, according to a study published January 29, 2020… Read More The “Firewalkers” of Karoo: Dinosaurs and Other Animals Left Tracks in a “Land of Fire”

Sleep Problems in Children

Teens with Autism Are Focus of New AAN Guideline It is not uncommon for children and teens with autism spectrum disorder to struggle with sleep. Trouble falling asleep and staying asleep or refusing to go to bed are just some of the sleep problems they can experience. To help families, neurologists and other healthcare providers… Read More Sleep Problems in Children

Mutations in Sperm May Reveal Risk for Autism

Researchers Use SDSC’s ‘Comet’ Supercomputer to Analyze Genome Sequences While the causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not fully understood, researchers believe both genetics and environment play a role. In some cases, the disorder is linked to de novo mutations that appear only in the child and are not inherited from either parent’s DNA. In a… Read More Mutations in Sperm May Reveal Risk for Autism

Predicting Autism Risk

New research study will analyze dried blood spots recorded from California newborns for 1,000 different molecules and chemicals; their tell-tale presence might predict autism risk years before symptoms appear, prompting early treatment and perhaps prevention Within days of birth, a few drops of blood are collected from every newborn in California—and across the United States… Read More Predicting Autism Risk

‘How I Fell for My Field’

For Valentine’s Day, we asked faculty and staff at nine CSU campuses to tell us how their lifelong love affair with their discipline began. As the adage goes, “Choose a job you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” The CSU is lucky to be replete with faculty and staff across its… Read More ‘How I Fell for My Field’

The Four Types of Love (Some Are Healthy, Some Are Not)💖

As Valentine’s Day approaches, think about how you use the word “love” in your life. You love your significant other, your kids, your friends and your siblings in different ways. Dr. Kirtly Parker Jones talks about the research behind these types of affection and why our loved ones make us crazy (in good ways and… Read More The Four Types of Love (Some Are Healthy, Some Are Not)💖

Happy wife, Happy life

A happy partner leads to a healthier future Science now supports the saying, “happy wife, happy life.” Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together.  “We spend a… Read More Happy wife, Happy life

Hollywood’s dirtiest secret?😗

With the Academy Awards around the corner, moviegoers and critics are busy scrutinizing the costumes, sets and performances of this year’s cinematic stand-outs.  When film scholar Hunter Vaughan watches a movie, he considers something else: How big of a toll did it take on the environment? “I want to provide a counter-narrative to the typical story… Read More Hollywood’s dirtiest secret?😗

The Hidden History of Valentine’s Day🥰

UNLV history professor Elizabeth Nelson separates facts about the effects of marketing, consumerism, and social media on the holiday’s evolution from fiction about love’s golden age. Pets, spouses, co-workers, friends, classmates: They’re all in line to be on the receiving end of another record year for Valentine’s Day spending, says a new survey by the… Read More The Hidden History of Valentine’s Day🥰

Half-Quantum Step Toward Quantum Advantage🤔

A famous metaphor for a qubit is Schrodinger’s hypothetical cat that can be both dead and alive. A flux qubit, a ring made of superconducting material, can have electric current flowing clockwise and counterclockwise simultaneously with an external field. The Science Superconductors are materials that have no electrical resistance below a critical temperature. They typically… Read More Half-Quantum Step Toward Quantum Advantage🤔

distinguish between those who have taken or handled cocaine😌😮

An experimental fingerprint detection approach can identify traces of cocaine on human skin, even after someone has washed their hands An experimental fingerprint detection approach can identify traces of cocaine on human skin, even after someone has washed their hands – and the test is also smart enough to tell whether an individual has actually… Read More distinguish between those who have taken or handled cocaine😌😮

What’s your brand?

A new algorithm analyzes social media data to help brands improve their marketing Researchers created an algorithm that successfully predicted consumer purchases. The algorithm made use of data from the consumers’ daily activity on social media. Brands could use this to analyze potential customers. The researchers’ method combines powerful statistical modeling techniques with machine learning-based… Read More What’s your brand?

Astronomers discover

An international team of astronomers led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found an unusual monster galaxy that existed about 12 billion years ago, when the universe was only 1.8 billion years old. Dubbed XMM-2599, the galaxy formed stars at a high rate and then died. Why it suddenly stopped forming stars… Read More Astronomers discover

Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

“Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and many other types of mental illness, are diseases of the brain and should be treated and studied as such,” say Johns Hopkins researchers. Does this statement seem a bit obvious and not exactly rocket science? Although it may, this isn’t how the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) — the… Read More Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

Too Much of a Good Thing? 😜

That Italian restaurant with the excellent linguini that you’ve indulged in so often you can no longer face a meal there. The conference with brilliant but endless keynotes: You start the day full of enthusiasm, but by the fourth breakout you’re flagging. The action movie that has you on the edge of your seat for… Read More Too Much of a Good Thing? 😜

Social Interaction Difficulties in Autism

Study Challenges Assumptions About Social Interaction Difficulties in Autism Autism is characterized in part by an individual’s challenges communicating and interacting socially with others. These difficulties have typically been studied in isolation by focusing on cognitive and behavioral differences in those with autism spectrum disorder, but little work has been done on how exchanges for… Read More Social Interaction Difficulties in Autism

Borderline Personality Disorder Potentially at Higher Risk for Heart Attacks

Mental health professionals should recommend screening patients for cardiovascular risks Middle-aged adults who show symptoms of borderline personality disorder may be at greater risk for a heart attack, as they show physical signs of worsening cardiovascular health more than other adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “Although borderline personality disorder is… Read More Borderline Personality Disorder Potentially at Higher Risk for Heart Attacks

Help with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

In women with uterine fibroids, the drug elagolix suppresses ovarian hormone production and prevents heavy menstrual bleeding About 50 % of women with uterine fibroids—non-cancerous muscle tumors that grow in the uterus—experience heavy menstrual bleeding and other symptoms.  Surgery is commonly recommended when these symptoms are severe enough to prompt a woman to seek treatment. … Read More Help with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

Sleep-Deprived Due to the Super Bowl? 40% of U.S. Adults Usually Are

Fun on Super Bowl Sunday can lead to a tired Monday for many. In a new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), nearly 40% of U.S. adults said they are more tired than usual the Monday after the Super Bowl. With pre-game entertainment, high-profile commercials, a star-studded halftime show and high-stakes football,… Read More Sleep-Deprived Due to the Super Bowl? 40% of U.S. Adults Usually Are